Should I ask for a raise during COVID? Most workers aren’t

p 1 report women still arenand8217t asking for raises even though the pandemic hit them hard

Asking for a raise is tough sufficient even in the very best of instances. However once you’re afraid you’ll lose your job, it’s even tougher. For the reason that pandemic had a disproportionate affect on girls and report numbers truly misplaced jobs over the previous yr, it’s not stunning that a new survey discovered that they’re much less more likely to ask for more cash.

Glassdoor partnered with the Harris Ballot to ask practically 1,500 employed U.S. adults about pay raises, bonuses, and/or cost-of-living will increase within the subsequent 12 months. Sixty-five % mentioned they didn’t ask for a raise during the pandemic however of these, practically three-quarters (73%) of girls didn’t ask for a raise as in comparison with simply 58% of males. That’s even if a quarter of U.S. workers took a pay reduce over the past yr.

That mentioned, greater than half (54%) are going to take a deep breath and make the pitch to get more cash this yr.

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Amongst a number of the different findings:

  • Thirty-one % of workers accepted their wage with out negotiating, down from 40% in March 2019.
  • Ladies are 19% much less more likely to ask for more cash than males.
  • Fewer U.S. workers efficiently negotiated their wage than they did two years in the past.
  • The variety of those that efficiently negotiated (14% of males and 12% of girls) is down from March 2019 when 18% of males and 16% of girls bought more cash.

The variety of girls both not asking or not getting raises additional skews the wage hole between female and male workers, which gave the impression to be trending in the proper course pre-COVID-19. Proper now, the common nationwide pay-disparity numbers indicated that it’ll take American feminine workers till March 24 this yr to earn the identical sum of money that males did performing the identical work over the course of 2020. Some estimates counsel that it’ll take 40 years to shut the gender pay hole.